Welcome back to the monthly Show Me Something quilt challenge and linkup. Stars are very prevalent in quilting. There are a wide variety of fabrics with stars on them, many traditional blocks that feature them, and stars can be easily free motion quilted. They can be paper pieced or foundation paper pieced. They can be featured in geometric quilts or landscapes. The list goes on. This month, Show Me Something with Stars!

Sometime in July please Show Me Something with Stars! Choose a quilt project you've already finished or use Show Me Something as a one-month quilt challenge to finish something new. Just make sure to linkup by July 31. See all the details below.

(If you haven't read about Frieda, my patriotic table runner, it's a great story.)

Here are the linkup details:

  • The monthly Show Me Something quilt linkup will start on the first of the month and continue until midnight (PST) on the last day of the month.
  • You may linkup a maximum of 3 new or old finished projects that fit the theme.
  • You may linkup a blog post or Instagram post.
  • If you linkup from a blog post, please link back to this post in your post. If you post from Instagram, you can tag me @sarahgoerquilts.
  • Visit others in the community who share their projects... and leave comments. :-)

Trying again this month... Copy the HTML text in the box below to include the image below on your blog with a link to this post. Be sure to insert it as HTML and not as text in a visual editor. Let me know if you try and it doesn't work.

Show Me Something with Stars linkup

 

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter


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In June, I paused from posting on my blog or social media to take time to reflect, educate myself further, and have conversations with friends, family, and people in my in-person community. We've come to a turning point of heightened awareness in our greater community of the systemic oppression that faces Black people every day in America.

I don't consider human rights to be a political matter. And I stand with the Black community. Black lives matter. I will do what I can to be the change.

Here is a list of some resources and organizations that I have found helpful in recent weeks.

Podcasts

Code Switch

Ten Percent Happier episodes #252-254

 

For Kids

Woke Homeschooling - US History Curriculum

The Every Mom booklist - books to start a conversation about race

@ainarasbookshelf on Instagram - book recommendations

 

Organizations to Follow and Support

Campaign Zero

Unicorn Riot

American Civil Liberties Union

 

Instagram Accounts to Follow

Joey Oteng: @drjotengii

Black Makers Matter: @blkmakersmatter

Social Justice Sewing Academy: @sjsacademy

 

Articles

The Atlantic: The Case for Reparations

The Root: A Timeline of Events that Led to the 2020 'Fed-Up'-rising

 

Quilt Africa Fabrics Online Show

And next week is the Quilt Africa Fabrics Online Show, July 8-11. Click over and follow the link to register for the free event.

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The thread featured in this post was given to my by Aurifil.

Seven years ago, when they were small, I started making garments for my children. They were fun little projects and much faster than making and finishing a quilt. These clothes were all made out of quilting cotton, though once I made a satin skirt for a friend's daughter. Quilting cotton is easy to sew with.

For years now I've been wanting to make garments for myself. In August of 2017, I started listening to the new, weekly Love to Sew podcast. Co-hosts Helen and Caroline are an inspiration as they "engage with the global sewing community and encourage listeners to create their dream wardrobe by sewing their own clothes." But still, I didn't sew myself a single garment. In January 2018, Caroline's shop, Blackbird Fabrics, offered a black and white bamboo jersey knit (95% rayon from bamboo/5% spandex). One of the things I love about her shop is that the fabric listings include recommendations for what types of garments a fabric is suitable for. This information is gold to a newbie garment sewist! And I'd been wanting to make a Blackwood Cardigan. So I ordered the fabric. And I love it. The more than two-year procrastination of actually making said cardigan was some combination of not liking the size I am, intimidation about sewing knits, and living an overextended/busy life. As an Aurifil Artisan for 2019-2020, I was delighted to see Me Made May as the May Artisan Challenge. I seriously thought I'd get it done way ahead of time and then share it in May. Nope. True to form, I was still sewing at the 11th hour. Last Friday, I started cutting out my fabric.

This project was the perfect opportunity for me to try out Aurifil 40/3. This thread was created with longarmers in mind, but I'd heard of other garment sewists who prefer this weight for their garments. It worked well for me. I pieced my cardigan using a zigzag stitch with a stretch needle. Due to my inexperience with sewing knits, during my test sewing I struggled to get a nice topstitch that didn't create puckers. So I opted to leave the pockets off (where will I put my M&Ms!?) and I should add topstitching to the front band later (the final step). I'll continue with the trial and error of finding the right settings/needle combination to get a result I like for topstitching. More needles are on the way!

My 8-year-old daughter took photos of me in the cardigan.

The pattern was clear and easy to follow. It certainly could have been sewn in a day or two. My cardigan is the long view in XXL of the original version of the pattern (equivalent to a 20/22 B-cup in the current version). I added 2" of length since I'm 5'7" and like my cardigans long. I don't think this was necessary, but I figured that I'd rather it be too long than too short for my liking. :-) It was hard for me to measure myself to really understand how long the pattern would be on me... and I failed to take into consideration that it would stretch a bit when it was on from the weight of the fabric.

Tips from my experience sewing my first knit garment:

  • Be really careful of fabric stretching when you lay it out to cut.
  • Mark notches using a marking pen.
  • Pin liberally.
  • Do a lot of test sewing to find a stitch that works well. Label each sample with your settings/needle. (See above.)
  • Maybe don't choose stripes for your first project. It added a level of difficulty.
  • Try stretch, jersey, and ballpoint needles (as the pattern recommends) as you may get different results with each.

Check out what others are sewing and wearing for Me Made May on Instagram at #memademay. See more Blackwoods at #blackwoodcardigan.

Since I mentioned them, here are a few of my favorite garments that I made for the kids years ago: