Monthly Archives: April 2020

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This morning I shared a tutorial of this block with a few dozen fellow guild members of SCVQA during our virtual meeting. We miss having meetings and are enjoying the Virtual Coffee Break Zoom meetings that Mel and Geri have been hosting. Have your local quilt groups been meeting virtually?

Also, this is your final reminder to link up your improv projects by the end of the month for Show Me Something Improv. :-)

 

Split Complementary

My color palette for this block grew out of some color play with my Kona fabric chips. Analogous Colors are a group of three colors that are adjacent on the color wheel. For example, yellow, yellow-green, and green. Complementary Colors are opposite each other on the color wheel. For example, yellow and violet, or yellow-green and red-violet. A Split Complementary color palette uses one color, combined with the neighbors of its complement. I've chosen red-violet with yellow and green.

Scrappy Slab*

I used a scrappy slab for the center of my block. This "made fabric" can be built from any scraps on hand and can be used alone, in a design of your own, or in any position in a traditional block or pattern you already own. The possibilities are truly endless.

I don't concern myself with starting pieces being square or seams being parallel and perpendicular. I simply sew together pieces of scrap fabric choosing mates that have edges that are roughly the same length. If necessary, I trim the edge of the fabric (with scissors) so I am sewing straight seams, and I attach them with 1/4" seam allowance, same as if I were doing precise piecing (though this is more forgiving in that sense). I press my seams open (having used a reduced stitch length during sewing) which is my personal preference. If necessary I trim off any overhanging fabric to give me a new straight edge for the next seam.

Generally, I start numerous scrappy slabs at once that can be pieced together as my project grows. Smaller slabs can be used just like individual pieces of fabric, combined with single or pieced chunks*. I find once slabs get large enough to be unwieldy that I have an easier time trimming edges with a rotary cutter and ruler.

Keep building to the size necessary for your project.

*I use the words slab and chunk to describe a pieced unit that is not a specific "block" size. Blocks are a predetermined, specific size. Slabs are what they are. You can trim down to a specific unit or block size as needed for a project.

16" Sawtooth Star Block

Color 1 (green): Using monochromatic scraps, piece a slab large enough to cut one (1) 8 1/2” x 8 1/2” square. 

Color 2 (yellow): Cut eight (8) 4 1/2” x 4 1/2" squares. 

Background/Color 3 (red-violet): Cut four (4) 8 1/2” x 4 1/2” rectangles and four (4) 4 1/2” x 4 1/2”  squares. 

Construct four one-at-a-time Flying Geese units.

Step 1: Aligning the edges, place a 4 1/2” x 4 1/2" yellow square on top of an 8 1/2” x 4 1/2” red-violet rectangle, right sides together. With your favorite marking tool, mark the stitching line corner to corner on the yellow square.

Step 2: Stitch on the marked line. Optionally, sew a second line of stitching 1/2" from your first line as shown. This will create a bonus HST when you trim 1/4" from your marked line.

Step 3: Trim 1/4" from your marked line as shown (or halfway between your two lines of stitching).

Step 4: Press your seam.

Step 5: Repeat on the second side.

Unit finishes at 8 1/2" x 4 1/2". Make 4.

Layout your nine pieces as shown. Sew each row together and combine rows for the finished block. Unfinished dimensions are 16 1/2" x 16 1/2".

Three blocks would make a 16" x 48" table runner. Sixteen blocks (or 9 blocks with an 8" border) would make a 64" x 64" lap quilt. These could all be identical color placement, a variety of placements of the same three colors, a variety of different split complementary combinations, or anything you'd like!

P.S. Here's another Sawtooth Star where I used my scrappy slab in the background and binding.

Happy quilting!

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In March, makers filled my screen with 31 Rainbow projects for Show Me Something Rainbow... what a happy pile of projects to enjoy during such a stressful time. A giant thank you to everyone who linked up! Here are a few that caught my eye. :-)

Sarah of Saroy shared her Geometry of Circles quilt which I love seeing again. It features my two favorite parts of quilting, bold, saturated color and geometric design. (Plus Alison Glass fabric.) Her blog post shows great detail of the process she used to make it!

 

My rainbow heart was so happy when I saw the Skylark feather quilt by Nancy of Grace and Peace Quilting. I love the colors, the scrappy binding, and the beautiful texture of her quilting.

 

Karin of BluePip Designs shared her Trinket quilt which makes me really want to get back to finishing mine! I love the detail of her (mostly) monochromatic blocks as well as the rainbow placement of her blocks. This would be such a happy quilt to curl up with.

 

Thank you to everyone who linked up last month! Be sure to hop back over to the Show Me Something Rainbow linkup to check out everything that was shared. (The belated Show Me Something with Triangles wrap-up is coming later this month.)

And this month I'm asking you to Show Me Something Improv! If you haven't had a chance to share a project yet, you have until the end of the month. Happy sewing!

 

 

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Season 11 of Project QUILTING ended two weeks ago and Kim decided to keep challenges rolling while much of the country (and the world) is sheltering in place during COVID-19. So PQQ 2020 (Project QUILTING: Quarantine 2020 edition) began last weekend with PQ Q.1: Big. Quite frankly everything seems big right now.

I have been sewing while I can, in the minutes I can steal between monitoring two elementary-aged children doing school at home, preparing too many meals per day, and all the other normal household tasks. I'm getting out nearly daily for short neighborhood walks alone. And we're trying to have quality family time among all the chaos. Since I have been sewing, I've been creating schnibbles (all those little bits of unusable fabric and batting). I save most scraps down to about an inch wide, so most of my schnibbles are the truly little bits. I keep them in a little trash bin from IKEA. Well, my pile of schnibbles had gotten quilt big and was threatening to overflow the trash bin. So it was time to do something about it.

I pulled out my fleece cat bed kit from Bay Area Modern Quilting and sewed it up so I could stuff it with all the little bits. It's hard to tell the scale, but the dimensions are approximately 16" x 20" on top and 5-6" tall. The top and bottom ovals are identical, with a double pass of stitching on each seam to attach the strip used for the sides.

I've developed the habit over time that when I have scraps I cross-cut them so the pieces are small. This goes for fabric, batting, and practice quilt sandwiches. All are cut up before going into the bin, so they are ready to go when I stuff a cat bed, or when I bag up my scraps to pass on to another guild member to fill cat beds.

This was a pretty quick project and it turned my big pile of schnibbles into a medium-size pile:

A big thanks to Kim for hosting additional quilt challenges during this weird time.

I hope you and you are healthy and safe. Thanks for visiting. Make sure to pop over to see what others have created for the Big challenge.