Monthly Archives: February 2022

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Back in October, with just a week left to the submission deadline, I finally dove in on my idea for the American Patchwork & Quilting Hexagon Quilting Challenge for QuiltCon. The moment I saw the challenge theme I'd had the idea of these "half and half" mismatch hexagons (which my daughter points out don't really count since they are actually octagons 😆).

The challenge rules stated "Eligible quilts must use a hexagon shape as a primary element in the design. A hexagon is defined as a six-sided polygon. The total of the internal angles of any simple hexagon is 720°." There was no size requirement for the challenge. In previous months I had done some work with green solids and was really excited about that palette. I love the play of values and contrast.

photo by Roberta Pabst

I'm very excited to have my first quilt hang at QuiltCon. I didn't make it to the show this year, but friends shared photos of my quilt hanging in the show with me. Also shown here, Hextraordinary by Isabelle Selak and Double Hex by Nancy Lambert.

Hexie Halves is 28" x 28" and finished with a faced binding.

The quilting is two-color walking foot quilting. I used an off kilter plaid as the backing fabric and quilted the quilt upside down, using the lines in the plaid as my guide.

photo by Roberta Pabst

"I came to quilting nearly 20 years ago through a love of the geometry of patchwork. As my personal style has shifted into improv piecing, I have enjoyed finding new and different geometric shapes to feature, purposefully or accidentally. When I first heard of the hexagon challenge, I was both excited to see what the category would bring and inspired by the idea of these “half and half” hexagons. My choice of monochromatic green solids gave me an opportunity to play with the interaction of color and value."

See all the Hexagon quilts in the show in Heather's walkthrough video and check out all the winners from the show. You'll see Sarah Ruiz's quilt that I contributed to in the group category.

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This week's Project QUILTING challenge is Mining Diamonds. I chose to go with the gemstone and reduced the Alison Glass Trinket pattern to 25%.

My daughter helped me decide on my color palette, white, light greys, and Kona Bright Pink for the background.

Reducing the pattern brought the 4" gem down to a tiny 1" size.

Since I was using such tiny pieces in my paper piecing, I opted for the Add-An-Eighth ruler for trimming my seams.

I decided on free motion echo quilting with 50wt Aurifil Fuchsia (#4020) and machine binding with a light grey. The quilt finishes at 2 1/2" x 3 1/2", the fourth in my Project QUITLING Season 13 Artist Trading Card series.

I'm linking up on Kim's blog for the Mining Diamonds challenge. Check out my previous challenge entries:

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I have finished and submitted to my first SAQA (Studio Art Quilt Associates) exhibition. The Northern California/Northern Nevada region issued a call last summer for a juried regional exhibition entitled Prism Play. From the start I loved the vision for this exhibition. The quilts are all required to be 15" wide by 45" long and monochromatic, following one of the color cards from Joen Wolfrom's Ultimate 3-in-1 Color Tool. The selected quilts will hang in multiple full color spectrum groupings during the exhibition.

In phase one we each signed up for a color (or colors) and were assigned one or more colors with the related cards of the color tool shipped to us. I learned really quickly that even though the majority of my fabrics are blenders and read as a single color, most of them have a little bit of white in the print. Black and white are not allowed since they fall outside of the monochromatic spectrum of the color card. I pivoted to using solids, and found that I had a reasonable variety of purple solids in my stash that matched the color card, including a variety of values. I later supplemented with a small fabric order.

Inspired by the recent bee "block" I made for Elizabeth, I decided to work in sash strips for the overall composition of my Prism Play quilt and set to work creating numerous two-fabric blocks exploring a variety of planned improv piecing and value contrast. I settled on a gradient placement of the block for the overall composition and enjoyed finding ways for neighboring blocks to interact or connect with one another.

I finished my quilt with irregular matchstick quilting, starting with walking foot quilting with even spacing and then adding irregular spacing with my lines on the second pass. The quilt was finished with a faced binding.

Submissions were due last week and we'll hear next month which quilts have been juried into the exhibition. Having seen some of the other work that was created for this call, I am looking forward to seeing this amazing exhibition hanging in a gallery! Congratulations to everyone who participated in creating a piece to submit.

Artist Statement

I enjoyed the parameters of working within a strictly defined monochromatic palette. This means everything is about the value, so I played with higher and lower value contrast in the components of my piece. Working in the time of a global pandemic, it is hard not to think about connections… how connecting to individuals has ebbed and flowed, and how those connections that are happening look different at this time. As I constructed the overall composition of the piece, I looked for ways to make connections between each section. The columns illustrate how a community is dependent upon each other, each member contributing the building blocks of the whole.

 

Edited to add: Read about the Prism Play catalog that I created.